in

Yurt Living: More Window Shopping

It’s ironic I’m writing about windows while my yurt in the tropical rain forest of Hawaii is enduring the heaviest rainfall I’ve ever witnessed. The awnings are proving their worth well.

Why don’t I close the windows? Well, I’m getting there. It’s just that I don’t have a deck around my 3-foot elevated yurt and therefore a ladder is required. The picture tells the story.

It’s not so bad, really. In fact I’m thoroughly impressed with my gutter system and how the awnings aren’t flapping in the winds. But I confess I started spot-mopping. That’s cause just enough sprinkles are blowing through the window screens and onto the floor to call for cleanup.

The rain is not letting up a bit and I will probably have to get soaked to get my rain gear out of the car, unlock my heavy aluminum ladder, and either carry my vinyl covers with me or zip the awnings up. Whew, I think I’ll keep mopping!

There are two things yurt dwellers can do to open and close windows easily. One is to have convenient outside access to each window. Two is to invest in the new conventional-type window options.

In previous blog-writes I explained how the Colorado Yurt Company added a low emissivity glass window with a crank to their offerings. Yurtco Manufacturing in British Columbia may have come up with the e-glass option first.

Now I find Spirit Mountain Yurts in New Mexico is producing what they call the Fortress Yurt. That model offers quality-famed Pella® windows. Watch the video and learn that grizzly bears spurred the company owners to develop a portable yurt with real glass therma windows (and a laminated wood wall).

The Pella® windows are 3-by-5 foot with screens. The windows are free of the lattice while interior walls are secured to the inside lattice. Obviously, options are increasing as yurt manufacturers get inventive.

But for those on a tight budget, Nomad Shelter in Alaska explains that the polyvinyl yurt window is like a boat window material. It will scratch and fog in about two or three years, pending on maintenance. It’s not an eco material, but buying and replacing them is cheap.

The Alaskan company points out that 90% of their clientele are professional single women as myself. Hmm … perhaps that’s more reason to design for nuisance weather?

RELATED POSTS:
Yurt Living: Window Shopping
Yurt Living: Weddings + Special Events
Yurt Living: Creative Flooring Suppliers
Yurt Living: Floor Options
Yurt Living: Platform Design Options
Yurt Living: Domes, Light, Furniture
Yurt Living: Dome, Cupola or Spire?
Yurt Living – Colors
Yurt Living – Creative Doorway Designs
Yurt Living – Design Rules Pricing
Yurt Living – Climate Comfort Part 2
Yurt Living – Climate Comfort
Yurt Living – Getting Started

Written by Delia Montgomery

I am Delia, d/b/a Chic Eco on www.ChicEco.com, and established myself as an eco fashion guru by learning "who makes what in the world of environmental fashion and design."

Enjoy reading some of my freelance writing about environmental design, fashion and art -- from both consumer and supplier perspectives. You may notice I focus most on individual eco designers, movers and shakers.

From sustainable fashion apparel to paint and flooring, discoveries are a rush. I get my kicks this way. I also offer sales representation of earth-friendly designed products for wholesale buyers. Retailers may take advantage of my services with factory-direct pricing. Spend less time sourcing and prevent green-washed purchases!

My other forte is connecting suppliers with business-to-business tools. Aspects of my business vary with consulting services while I'm proud to be the aide that embraces unique and innovative gigs.

I'm originally a Kentucky Blue Grass gal who relocated to Maui early 2006 and the tropical Puna District of Big Island, Hawaii late 2007. Walk the talk is my motto here.

Early 2009 I constructed a yurt home office in a semi-urban setting on a tiny lot. My water comes from the sky, contained in a catchment that's not likely to dry in this rain forest. The electric is designed for solar conversion. I grow about 30% of my food organically, compost, and recycle to the hilt. Permaculture with a full eco system is my gardening style.

In fact, gardening is my ultimate joy. I seek gigs like design, weeding and planting between other jobs. My love is Hawai'i which has more climate zones than any state. There are frequent earthquakes here, typically under a 3.0 magnitude, and I happen to dig the vibrations. It's a wonderful simple life in paradise. As I grow older and wiser, I become more and more grateful.

3 Comments

  1. I can’t stress enough the importance of going with a good manufacturer. Even some of the companies you’ve mentioned have a bit of a bad rap, so buyers, do your due diligence. Search yurtinfo.org or the bbb or just a random google usually turns up more than enough information on a yurt manufacturer. We can’t please all the people all the time, but if it’s a decent company, they do please most of the people most of the time. Glad to hear the awnings and gutters are working overtime, Delia! I didn’t have them in my first yurt. In our next yurt we’ll go with the operable windows. But for the cost, they’re the perfect in between~ Catchment overflowing yet?
    Aloha~

  2. Please avoid the heart ache and do not buy from spirit mountain yurts. After all the problems I have had I want to warn others.

Big Wardrobe Shopping in UK

XS Project :: One Persons Trash Is Anothers Treasure.