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Published on July 19th, 2012 | by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)

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Project Runway Does It Gunn’s Way

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I don’t know about you, but I’ve been crossing off the days until the premiere of season 10 of Project Runway like a kid waiting for summer vacation. Obviously, the fashions are inspiring, the drama is entertaining, and the judges’ critiques are absolutely hilarious, but one of the main reasons that Project Runway is do-not-disturb television is the unparalleled Tim Gunn.

Like a fashion father figure, he guides the designers to create clothing that’s fun, fashion-forward, and best of all, eco- and animal-friendly. Tim is a vocal opponent of fur and the cruelty to animals and environmental destruction involved in its production. At his direction, Project Runway is 100 percent fur-free (and Tim takes this edict seriously, as Josh Christensen from season nine can attest).

There are plenty of reasons why a classy chap like Tim or a beautiful model like Elisabetta Canalis would choose to shun fur. It takes massive amounts of nasty chemicals such as ammonia, formaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and other chromates and bleaching agents to keep fur from rotting, and besides, does anyone really want to wear an animal who has been skinned alive? Um, no thanks.

Until the new season of Project Runway starts tonight on Lifetime, we can watch Tim in action in a laugh-out-loud video of him chasing Swatch, the resident dog at Mood:

Also check out the undercover fur farm investigation video he narrated for PETA. Both show Tim exactly as we would expect him to be: kindhearted, sincere, and impossibly stylish.

Image Credit: Tim Gunn photo via Lifetime


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About the Author

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), with more than 3 million members and supporters, is the largest animal rights organization in the world. PETA focuses its attention on the four areas in which the largest numbers of animals suffer the most intensely for the longest periods of time: on factory farms, in laboratories, in the clothing trade, and in the entertainment industry.



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