Designers + Brands

Published on March 23rd, 2010 | by Susanna Schick

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The Green Initiative Humanitarian Fashion Show at Los Angeles Fashion Week

Last saturday afternoon, Sunset Gower Studios played host to a different kind of show, created by the Green Youth Movement and produced by Gallery LA. The Green Youth Movement was started by Archer student Ally Maize, whose mission includes:

“As founder of GYM, I hope to one day garner the support of politicians and educators to create a practical and research based environmental course of study that would ultimately become integrated in every elementary school education curriculum across the nation.”

Eco-Fashionistas of Tomorrow

I asked these chic and lovely fashion show guests what they thought was the most critical issue around sustainability in fashion. They exclaimed, as only 6th graders can, “RECYCLED MATERIALS!” One mentioned that her dad had a jacket made from soda bottles. I told them they were right on the money, as that’s exactly what Lorrie Vogel, General Manager of Nike Considered, said when I interviewed her for CleanTechnica.

Then I asked them who their favorite fashion designer was and they unanimously agreed “Betsey Johnson!” You see, there’s the disconnect. Here we have a group of savvy, well-to-do consumers who care about sustainability and know what’s most important, but their favorite designer isn’t doing anything about it, or else isn’t telling us. I suspect Betsey would be able to keep these girls enthralled much longer if she used recycled nylon & polyester fibers, and perhaps the latest in eco printing for those brilliant colors and fabulous floral prints she does so well! This TreeHugger article mentions some of the leading innovators in the field of eco textile manufacturing.

Eco Designers of Today

However, I think any Betsey girl would have been wowed by LA designer Emily Factor. I certainly was, and would love to find out more about how she creates those lovely print silks. Her collection was fun, flirty and edgy enough to be interesting, even imagining these sheer pieces with slips, which is how they’re likely to be shipped. Plenty of designers send models down the runway in sheer dresses that will ultimately be shipped fully lined. At Betsey Johnson, those slips are usually polyester, one of the easiest fibers to source recycled these days.

Photo courtesy of Bill Ware

The next designer was Seattle-based Lizzie Parker. Her pieces were much more casual and wearable for most women. She featured her new eizzil line, which is designed to be truly “one-size-fits-all” and it really is! It’s also made in the US, and each piece retails below $100, making it affordable too. However, it’s made from organic bamboo, and unfortunately so many vendors have mis-labeled bamboo that the FTC has issued a statement against it, as mentioned previously here.

Photo courtesy of Bill Ware

The last designer, LA-based Puridee, creates ethereal and simple gowns for the most discriminating eco bride. Some of her gowns are dyed, but most of the press around this line is bridal. They had a certain rawness about them, like a gown you’d expect a raw vegan bride to wear. In fact, they’re vegan-friendly too, as they’re made from peace silk. Their website explains the sourcing very eloquently, under “pure & natural.” Of course my favorite was the finale, a mini worn with black knee-high boots, perfect for rolling to the chapel on two wheels.

Photo Courtesy Green LA Girl via Creative Commons License

The reusable gift bag was great too, it included a tiny compressed towel, an hourglass shower timer, and some great coupons. Green LA Girl has more to say about the clothes and the handsome and accomplished special guest whom they honored for his hard work in greening Los Angeles.


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About the Author

Susanna is passionate about anything fast and electric. As long as it's only got two wheels. She covers electric motorcycle racing events, test rides electric motorcycles, and interviews industry leaders. Occasionally she deigns to cover automobile events in Los Angeles for us as well. However, she dreams of a day when Los Angeles' streets resemble the two-wheeled paradise she discovered living in Barcelona and will not rest until she's converted the masses to two-wheeled bliss.



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