Healthy Habits 398px-camomile_colza_clouds

Published on June 21st, 2008 | by Lucille Chi

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Glowing Naturally in the Summer Sun, Part II

Earlier this week we talked about some DIY tips for a healthy glow in the summer sunshine and we will continue to share skin saving tips throughout summer. Please remember when trying these natural remedies for the skin always use a good full spectrum sun protection (preferably organic). When we’re out in that sexy bikini or sundress always try to have good sun coverage for your special skin type. Stay tuned for our brilliant expert tips on great summer skin here on Feelgood Style.

Today I’d love to share more natural home remedies for glowing skin. Fruits like strawberries and papaya contain enzymes that cleanse the skin of impurities. Avocado is a rich natural moisturizer. Anti-inflammatory skin soothers like cucumber and chamomile prevent redness and calm skin after a gorgeous day in the sunshine.

Chamomile is not only a relaxing tea, but it also calms the skin. This beautiful skin article talks about how to make a simple hot chamomile towel mask to feel refreshed. Some swear by placing cool chamomile tea bags under the eyes to reduce puffy, red or tired eyes.

I also have a great summer tip for this flower. Put a little cool steeped chamomile H20 into a sprtizer bottle, and bring it with you when you are out in the sunshine! If you are a blond or brunette it will lift sunlight highlights in your lovely locks!

Cucumber cools the delicate eye area. Try placing a slice over each eye for a mini facial. For an easy cucumber face toner here is a little recipe. Keep it in the fridge for an added cooling effect after freshening up from a yoga class, brisk walk, or bike ride.

Papaya mashed into a mask makes for an exfoliating treat for the skin. The enzymes in papaya break down dead skin cells and lifts the dewey layer of fresh skin underneath. You can also use the papaya skins after enjoying the fruit. Try not to leave it on too long as it may over-exfoliate, to avoid this mix in a little honey into the mask.

Strawberry is known to clear pores and lift dirt and oils from the skin, try mashing one of your strawberries for a quick oil clearing mask if you’ve returned from a sunbath sweating while wearing sunscreen.

Avocados protect your body (inside and out) from harsh environments and topically it really nourishes and protects from dry skin.

If your skin is dry from the sun and nourishment is needed try this classic avacado mask: All you need is ½ avocado, ¼ cup honey. Mash the avocado and stir in honey, Apply to skin, wait 10 minutes, rinse face with washcloth.

The glutathione in avocado one of the strongest antioxidants and helps to regulate immune cells, detoxify, and protect against cancer. Try snaking on avocado once a week as well as integrating it into your beauty routine.

These gifts from the earth are meant to enhance your sun protection regimen. Sunscreen is top priority when the sunshine heat is on this summer. Try these easy to create healing remedies for when your sun-ripe glow needs a little soothing from mother nature.

Chamomile image by Simon Koopmann licensed under Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 2.0 Germany


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About the Author

Lucy Chi loves good green design, ethical fashion, environmental art and education, renewables, holistic healing and more. She has been dedicating her energies toward finding and drawing attention to all the ways in which products, companies, and industries are moving toward creating a more sustainable world on the global scale, as well as the way individuals are moving toward living sustainably, and healing at the personal level. Sustainability studies: PresidioMBA.org & B.S. Cornell University, College of Human Ecology, Dept. of Textiles and Fiber Science. Contact: lucillechi (at) gmail.com



  • Suzanne Vesely

    I am a reference librarian and I would like to use your image of chamomile in our (nonprofit) newsletter: Maharishi University of Management Library. I would give you credit–at one place it said that the image was under a Creative Commons License but I don’t see anything like that on your actual website–please let me know either way–thanks, and have a great summer!

  • Suzanne Vesely

    I am a reference librarian and I would like to use your image of chamomile in our (nonprofit) newsletter: Maharishi University of Management Library. I would give you credit–at one place it said that the image was under a Creative Commons License but I don’t see anything like that on your actual website–please let me know either way–thanks, and have a great summer!

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